Kevin Dickinson wrote an article for Big Think titled The value of owning more books than you can read.

« According to statistician Nassim Nicholas Taleb, these unread volumes represent what he calls an “antilibrary,” and he believes our antilibraries aren’t signs of intellectual failings. Quite the opposite… Taleb laid out the concept of the antilibrary in his best-selling book The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable… The antilibrary’s value stems from how it challenges our self-estimation by providing a constant, niggling reminder of all we don’t know. »

« These selves of unexplored ideas propel us to continue reading, continue learning, and never be comfortable that we know enough. Jessica Stillman calls this realization intellectual humility… In her article, Jessica Stillman ponders whether the antilibrary acts as a counter to the Dunning-Kruger effect, a cognitive bias that leads ignorant people to assume their knowledge or abilities are more proficient than they truly are. Since people are not prone to enjoying reminders of their ignorance, their unread books push them toward, if not mastery, then at least an ever-expanding understanding of competence. »

« Tsundoku is the Japanese word for the stack(s) of books you’ve purchased but haven’t read. Its morphology combines tsunde-oku (letting things pile up) and dukosho (reading books).  »

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