Brian X. Chen wrote a New York Times article titled I Shared My Phone Number. I Learned I Shouldn’t Have.

« Emre Tezisci, a security researcher at Fyde with a background in telecommunications, took on the task with gusto. He and I had never met or talked. He quickly plugged my cellphone number into a public records directory. Soon, he had a full dossier on me — including my name and birth date, my address, the property taxes I pay and the names of members of my family. »

« From there, it could have easily gotten worse. Mr. Tezisci could have used that information to try to answer security questions to break into my online accounts. Or he could have targeted my family and me with sophisticated phishing attacks. He and the other researchers at Fyde opted not to do so, since such attacks are illegal. »

« You might also want to set up a second phone number to cloak your personal digits altogether. You could share this second phone number with people and brands you don’t entirely trust. Apps like Google Voice and Burner let you create a different number that you can use for calls and texts. »

« Here’s a bonus piece of advice. If you have business cards with your personal number printed on them, shred them and order new ones with just your office line. »

 

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