Doug Garnett wrote a blog post titled The Customer’s Journey Isn’t About You.

« While customers ARE on a journey, it is not about you. »

« “Maps” like this don’t map the customer journey — they map the company journey. »

« Note how little time any individual customer spends around a “touchpoint” where your company can affect them. Also note that there is a large “accidental” component in those contacts. The accidental component suggests why media planning is not about “placing” the contact with laser-like accuracy — but in setting up communications for good “accidents” which lead to profit. »

« There are parallel efforts where consumers might cross paths with your communication. »

« An individual consumer encounters different elements of your company, brand, product, and communication in sporadic and random ways — no matter how carefully you might “plan” for a linear journey. And each individual consumer encounters (a) a different random collection of your communication and (b) encounters that communication in a different random order.  »

« Learning is not linear. Consumers learn in bits and pieces — like humans seem to learn everything. Any communication planning which ignores this truth can only succeed accidentally. »

« The advertising residual is more important than the advertising. In my planning work, I focus heavily on the “advertising residual” — that which is left behind after the communication disappears. A great way to think is to focus on the need for a random set of encounters to leave behind a coherent collection of residuals. That collection of residuals lead to brand value, product value, purchase, and long term consumption. »

« For the consumer, there’s no funnel. »

« I hope many will give up attempts to force communication into tidy boxes of linear persuasion… Any good negotiator knows that persuasion is one of the least linear processes known to mankind. And the negotiators who fail are those who force it to move in discrete steps. »

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s